Tag Archives: Women

In Praise of Women

This is a General Conference Odyssey post.

We live in a society where it is “uncool” to be ladylike, act like a lady, and especially think like one. But don’t we secretly long to see a man honor his role and a woman honor her role according to the way God created them? Neal A. Maxwell gave an inspiring talk, in praise of women, back in April 1978, that simply makes me happy to read. I like hearing praise for women being feminine women.

First, he states, “In the work of the Kingdom, men and women are not without each other, but do not envy each other, lest by reversals and renunciations of role we make a wasteland of both womanhood and manhood.”

Unfortunately, that is exactly what has happened in our world today. We don’t praise the identifying roles of womanhood or manhood. We’ve meshed them all together and created a wasteland of the human spirit, all in the name of equality.

Well, this is where I turn to the scriptures to discover what a virtuous woman should be (Proverbs 31:10-31):

Who can find a virtuous woman? For her price is far above rubies. (Women are to be honored and praised for their womanhood.)

She seeketh wool and flax, and worketh willingly with her hands. (She tends animals and gardens and clearly works hard all the day long.)

She riseth also while it is yet night, and giveth meat to her household, and a portion to her maidens. (A woman’s work is never done. Some of us have help, most of us do not, nevertheless, we all share in the load of providing for the comforts of the home.)

She considereth a field, and buyeth it: with the fruit of her hands she planteth a vineyard. (She makes important decisions and directs the welfare of her household, which extends into the community.)

She stretcheth out her hand to the poor; yea, she reacheth forth her hands to the needy. (Her compassion knows no bounds; she takes care of all she can who are in need.)

She is not afraid of the snow for her household: for all her household are clothed with scarlet. (She provides for her household first, seeing that her children are dressed well and secure.)

She maketh herself coverings of tapestry; her clothing is silk and purple. (Every woman has the right to see herself as royalty.)

She maketh fine linen, and selleth it; and delivereth girdles unto the merchant. (She provides income through her talents and is responsible in that endeavor.)

She openeth her mouth with wisdom; and in her tongue is the law of kindness. (She is intelligent, wise, and kind.)

Her children arise up, and call her blessed; her husband also, and he praiseth her. (Her children and husband recognize her worth and praise her as a woman of virtue.)

Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: but a woman that feareth the Lord, she shall be praised. (Faith is more important to her than vanity and appearance.)

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Sister Dalton’s Rallying Call to Virtue for Latter-day Saint Women

Stand for virtue. Exemplify virtue. Change the world.

These words were highlighted in a recent fireside for Relief Society women in which Sister Elaine Dalton, former General President of the Young Women for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, spoke. In the fireside, she issued another call for a return to virtue, just as she has done for over 11 years:

“There has never been a time like this,” she said. “I’ve never seen the opposition be greater, but I’ve never seen the opportunities be greater, and as my husband and I sit up here looking out at you, there is so much hope because you really are the change-the-world generation. You’re the ones who will change the world.

“You are the ones who have been spoken of by prophets, seers and revelators all through the scriptures. You’re the ones who have been prophesied about. You are the ones who will lead the world and who will lead the women of the world because you are ‘different in happy ways,’” she said, referencing a quote by former LDS Church President Spencer W. Kimball.

Sister Dalton told of a trip last month to New York City, where she and her husband found themselves driving through the city during the Women’s March.

“We were in a cab, and as I watched those women marching and yelling, and should I say, behaving anything but ladylike and using language that was very unbefitting of daughters of God,” Sister Dalton said. “As I watched all of that take place, my heart just sunk and I thought to myself, ‘What would happen if all those women were marching and calling to the world for a return to virtue?’”

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Mothers in the Scriptures

Motherhood isalt-lake-temple-pioneer-family-lds-770842-gallerys one of the most important aspects of the Plan of Salvation. Without it, none of us would be here in our mortal bodies. When discussing mothers and motherhood, I find it fitting to think about and study ancient women who serve as wonderful examples of what kind of mothers and women we should be. Although there are many wonderful women in the scriptures, I have chosen to highlight five: Eve, the Mother of Moses, Namoi, Mary the Mother of Jesus, and Sariah from the Book of Mormon.

Eve

Eve was the very first mortal mother on this earth. She was given the ability to bear children when she partook of the forbidden fruit and was cast out of the Garden of Eden with Adam. She was given the name Eve “because she was the mother of all living.” (Genesis 3:20) In fact, Eve means “life” in Hebrew.

We know from the book of Moses that Adam and Eve had many more children than Cain, Abel and Seth. “And Adam knew his wife and she bare unto him sons and daughters, and they began to multiply and to replenish the earth.” (Moses 5:2) The Book of Moses also goes into a deeper description of the type of woman Eve was. Moses 5:1 says that Eve labored with Adam. In verse 11 Eve says, “Were it not for our transgression we never should have known good and evil, and the joy of our redemption, and the eternal life which God giveth unto all the obedient.” Then in verse 12 Eve taught her children. Continue reading

Becoming the Women God Needs

Russel M NelsonIn October 2015, President Nelson gave a landmark talk to women, titled, A Plea to My Sisters.

In it, he prophesied that “attacks against the Church, its doctrine, and our way of life are going to increase.”

Then he named the sort of women needed to withstand these attacks. He said, “we need women who have a bedrock understanding of the doctrine of Christ and who will use that understanding to teach and help raise a sin-resistant generation. We need women who can detect deception in all of its forms. We need women who know how to access the power that God makes available to covenant keepers and who express their beliefs with confidence and charity. We need women who have the courage and vision of our Mother Eve.”

There are five main traits, President Nelson told that women they need to have:

  1. Women who have a bedrock understanding of the doctrine of Christ and who will use that understanding to teach and help raise a sin-resistant generation.
  2. Women who can detect deception in all of its forms.
  3. Women who know how to access the power that God makes available to covenant keepers
  4. Women who express their beliefs with confidence and charity.
  5. Women who have the courage and vision of our Mother Eve.

Myself, like many others, have probably asked how. “How can I become that woman?” After some pondering and visits to the temple, these are my initial answers to how we can become the women President Nelson described: Continue reading

Wide-Eyes on Feminism at World Congress of Families

Embedded image permalinkOne of the breakout sessions at the World Congress of Families XI, opened my eyes about feminism. Entitled “The Beneficial and Harmful Influences of Feminism”, it threw me some punches. Because feminism is multi-faceted, it was important to clarify that feminism, defined as women speaking up and speaking out for the right to vote and to have equal opportunity, was not going to be the discussion. While these are beneficial influences that have benefited and changed the world and certainly the lifestyle of many women, the discussion would focus mainly on the harm “radical feminism” has done against women.

 

gayle ruzickaGail Ruzicka, who came from Utah’s Chapter of Eagle Forum, centered her thoughts on Feminine vs. Feminism. Feminists draw upon the acceptable idea that we must fight for strong women and their opportunity to speak up for themselves, but in actuality, they have a political agenda to change laws and traditional moral standards.

Feminists want to remove everything that represents our male counterparts, but “Feminine,” is the Biblical definition of a true woman. Continue reading

Event in Salt Lake City: Family Lights the World

Can you feel it?  Can you feel the stirring in the air of something wonderful to come?  I have felt a stirring within for a while now and it has caused me to seriously think about how I can do my part to be a light of influence in this world. About a year ago, a friend shared with me a quote from President Spencer W. Kimball:

Much of the major growth that is coming to the Church in the last days will come because many of the good women of the world … will be drawn to the Church in large numbers. This will happen to the degree that the women of the Church reflect righteousness and articulateness in their lives and to the degree that the women of the Church are seen as distinct and different—in happy ways—from the women of the world.”[1]

My friend and I wondered together if this prophecy concerned us.  Imagine our surprise when President Russell M. Nelson declared in our recent conference that “You are the women he (President Kimball) foresaw!” [2] With that announcement by the Lord’s apostle, I burst into tears. You would think that such a statement would have me trembling in fear to know that such a responsibility lay on my shoulders, but it was the joy that Heavenly Father needed to use my very feminine gifts to “help prepare the world for the Second Coming of the Lord[3] that made me rejoice!

Isn’t that amazing?  The Lord needs us, right here, right now, to put aside the things of the world and “take (our) rightful and needful place in (our) home, in (our) community, and in the Kingdom of God.”[4] Wow. Alright sisters, let’s get to work! Continue reading