Tag Archives: Family proclamation

I Marched Last Weekend, Too.

 

I did a lot of marching this past weekend, and I’ve heard many other women did, too.

 

 

It all began Saturday morning and my MARCH went like this:

  •  I MARCHED downstairs early that morning and went straight over to my husband bent down and interrupted his DIY Network viewing with a great big toe-curling kiss.  I rubbed my hands on his head as we smiled at each other.  I’m thankful that our love is still growing and that he wants to hurry home each night after work to be with me.
  • I MARCHED out the front door, with my husband beside me, for a lovely fast-paced three-mile walk. We talked about all sorts of things and enjoyed some good exercise.  I’m thankful for my body and try to do what I can to keep it healthy and strong.
  • Next, I MARCHED outside to do some yard work.  The rain we had during the week had stopped and the wind had dried things pretty well.  We trimmed our roses together and talked some more.  I love making our home a beautiful place inside and out.  I think it shows the Lord, and my husband, that I’m grateful for the things they have both provided for me.
  • After that, I MARCHED into the kitchen to make us a delicious fajita lunch.  I love cooking.  I especially love cooking for my husband and family.  I find joy by serving them that way.  I’m lucky he’s not a fussy eater
  • I cleaned up and  I MARCHED off to the movies with my boyfriend – who also happens to be my husband – where we sat hand in hand watching the show. We are very protective of our relationship. Date nights, or afternoons, have been a must for us.
  • Home again I MARCHED into the game room where we played several rounds of our family’s favorite card game Nertz with our youngest daughter. Her beautiful family of five are temporarily living with us before they move.  They’ve been with us for a couple of months now.  It’s wild, and crazy, and loud, but I’m happy we have the extra time with them and the ability to help. I’m even more glad they felt comfortable enough to ask us.

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The Doctrine of the Not Canonized Family Proclamation

Family Proclamation Because “The Family: A Proclamation to the World” is not canonized, some LDS members feel they are free to either reject its teachings or interpret it at will. For example, the family proclamation teaches that marriage is only between a man and a woman. Some who disregard the proclamation as doctrine support and even advocate for same-sex marriage. Some go so far as to believe the doctrine of marriage will change. They feel that although the teachings in the proclamation pertain to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon), the world at large should not be held to the same standard.

However, the proclamation teaches eternal, unchanging doctrines canonized in the standard works of the Church and affirmed by the consistent teachings of modern prophets and apostles.

What is Doctrine?

In the first place, the proclamation is strongly supported by the established criteria for “what is doctrine” as explained by the Church. Since the proclamation is firmly rooted in established doctrine, it is not necessary that it be canonized for members to uphold its teachings with confidence. LDS leaders, for over 20 years, have used the family proclamation as the gold standard by which they teach and establish the official position of the Church on the doctrines of marriage, family relationships, and gender identity. Prophets of God speak on His behalf; therefore, members sustain them as they uphold the doctrines declared in the proclamation. As members sustain and defend the proclamation, families are strengthened. The family proclamation meets all authoritative criteria for what constitutes LDS doctrine. Continue reading

Fathers, Be Good To Your Daughters

“Pop icon Katy Perry once said, ‘I don’t need a dude to have children.  We are living in the future. I’m not anti-men. I love men. But there is an option if someone doesn’t present himself.’  . . . I’m going to spend the next little while addressing this statement, and say, ‘Katy, if you have a daughter, she will need a man as a father-figure.”

That was BYU-Idaho professor Dr. Timothy Rarick’s opening message to a packed audience of UN diplomats and international guests in his recent presentation on the impact of fathers at the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (CSW). Using research, anecdotal stories, and multi-media, Dr. Rarick made a compelling case as to why daughters need fathers, and fathers need daughters. 

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Finding the Best Fit: Four Marriage Paradoxes

To Try On or Not to Try On? That is the Question.

store windowsI don’t like to buy clothes online. I have, but it always seems to be a 50/50 proposition. I’m a tall, Scandinavian gal and concerned that things won’t fit right, and I’m correct at least half the time. For me, heading to the store where I can try them on works best. I want to make sure it’s long enough.  I don’t want it to pull and tug and bunch up. I want to twist and turn in the clothes, in front of that three-way mirror to be sure nothing that shouldn’t show doesn’t. Many of my friends enjoy shopping for the season’s latest styles online in their sweats with a cup of hot cocoa. Whatever they order comes right to their door and fits great for them. I wish things were different for me that way. But then again, if they were, maybe I’d miss out on that big chunky necklace hanging by the check-out counter that looks perfect with my new blouse.

How about shopping for a spouse? Do you think someone might have better success, find a ‘better fit,’ by trying a person on first? Can people find a great fit or a good match, by not engaging in ‘up close and personal’ behaviors before the wedding? What do you think the prevailing thoughts in society are on this? Continue reading

My Husband Is My Boyfriend! A Marriage Formula.

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I am crazy in love with my wonderful husband, Chad.  It is more common than not for me to introduce him to others as ‘my boyfriend’. I make no apologies for it, or for advocating that every marriage can, and should, be as wonderful as ours is. The health and vitality of our relationship is not due to who we each are individually, because we are each flawed people (trust me on this). Instead, it has everything to do with the conscious choices we have both made to:

  • Use the counsel of the Lord on marriage, given through His prophets, as our guide.
  • Watch and follow the example of those couples we have observed around us who obviously find joy and satisfaction in their marriages.
  • And to make ‘us’ our highest priority.
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Camilla & Spencer W. Kimball

marriagePresident Spencer W. Kimball was the prophet of my youth and during the emergence of my personal testimony. I love him, and trust his counsel still. He and his sweet wife, Camilla, have (yes, I say that in present tense) a beautiful marriage. I enjoyed watching them together. So when he spoke on marriage, I listened. In an address titled “Oneness In Marriage”, this beloved prophet made this hope-filled promise: Continue reading

Day One Report: World Congress of Families

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Jenny Oaks Baker and the Baker children.

Opening ceremonies for the World Congress of Families at the stunning Grand America Hotel began with pageantry as a procession of young adults from countries around the world entered, carrying flags from their native lands. A crowd of 3,000 gathered to listen to the some of the best and brightest pro-traditional family scholars, educators, psychologists, statisticians, researchers, politicians, religious leaders, Hollywood film producers, and United Nations policy advocates in the world. The Mormon Women Stand team is here this week to report on the events of this historic congress, and we wanted to share this powerful information with our nearly 40,000 followers in hopes that you, too, can join in standing for life and the traditional family.

Reporting from Mormon Women Stand: Jan Tolman, Bethany Packard, Angela Fallentine and Gina Holt.

Highlights of day one include: Continue reading

Infidelity Sells But We’re Not Buying

laie-temple-wedding-lds-37780-wallpaperAre we tired yet of fornication before marriage and infidelity after marriage? The media would have us believe it’s natural, or that men and women are not made to be monogamous. We’ve heard all the reasons out there, but I like the way that Dr. Scott Haltzman, a therapist and expert on marriage, challenges this notion:

“Infidelity is not a victimless act. The decision to have an affair involves a secret choice made by one person to rob another person of what is rightfully his or hers: fidelity. It is an act that includes lying, family neglect and often the theft of time and money.

Does that sound harsh? It ought to. Sociology experts and evolutionary psychologists can argue all day long as to whether monogamy is natural or whether it is reasonable for anyone to keep unrealistic vows made in earnest. While the data on the prevalence of infidelity is daunting (about 40 percent of couples will be affected by an affair), the majority of married people have never had affairs. It’s amazing all the “unnatural” things humans can do when they put their minds to it!

So if you’re surprised at the moral outrage against infidelity, you shouldn’t be. Plain and simple, it’s wrong.”

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The Family Proclamation and Latter-day Calamity

file1851313802464Often when we think of calamities foretold in the Latter-days, we think of earth quakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, war, and financial collapses. These are all calamities and all foretold of in the scriptures. Yet there has been one calamity in the Latter-days that overshadows all others. It has caused the most pain and heartache for the most people. That calamity is the break-down of the family.

Consider the words found in D&C 1:17-22:

17 Wherefore, I the Lord, knowing the calamity which should come upon the inhabitants of the earth, called upon my servant Joseph Smith, Jun., and spake unto him from heaven, and gave him commandments;
18 And also gave commandments to others, that they should proclaim these things unto the world; and all this that it might be fulfilled, which was written by the prophets—
19 The weak things of the world shall come forth and break down the mighty and strong ones, that man should not counsel his fellow man, neither trust in the arm of flesh—
20 But that every man might speak in the name of God the Lord, even the Savior of the world;
21 That faith also might increase in the earth;
22 That mine everlasting covenant might be established;

The Lord, knowing the calamity that should come in the latter-days, gave the people the prophets beginning with Joseph Smith and commandments. He gave the people prophets that they might not take counsel from man or the arm of flesh—that faith may increase and that the everlasting covenant may be established.

When looking at the consequences following the break-down of the family, we can assume that the Lord was, in part, referring to the new and everlasting covenant of marriage. We can also assume that the Lord meant all other covenants established through the restoration of the Priesthood to bless the children of men. Continue reading

7 Ways to Have a Gospel Centered Home

Familyproc2Teaching our children truth is one of the most important edicts given to Latter-day Saint parents. As we teach our children gospel principles, we give then the armor and tools they need to fight off the temptations and false philosophies of our time. The Family Proclamation declares:

HUSBAND AND WIFE have a solemn responsibility to love and care for each other and for their children. “Children are an heritage of the Lord” (Psalm 127:3). Parents have a sacred duty to rear their children in love and righteousness, to provide for their physical and spiritual needs, and to teach them to love and serve one another, observe the commandments of God, and be law-abiding citizens wherever they live. Husbands and wives—mothers and fathers—will be held accountable before God for the discharge of these obligations. (The Family: A Proclamation to the world)

President Boyd K. Packer further taught that:

True doctrine, understood, changes attitudes and behavior…The study of the doctrines of the gospel will improve behavior quicker than a study of behavior will improve behavior. … That is why we stress so forcefully the study of the doctrines of the gospel. (Boyd K. Packer, Little Children, Oct 1986)

Some parents find it challenging to get their children to listen and learn the gospel. Yet it can be done. These are some ideas to get you started on making your home a gospel centered home: Continue reading

The Double Edged Sword Of Traditional Families

BubblesWhile enjoying a trip to Europe recently, I was pleasantly surprised to find so many young families walking around. Most cities have a central square with shops and cathedrals where they do their every day  activities. This is where we find husbands and wives holding one or two children around them. Men are holding their wives’ hands, a little one is swinging between the two of them; women are dressed in dresses that bring out their best features. The picture of traditional family love is much more common than perhaps the media would lead us to believe.

“Traditional family” however, is a double-edged sword. While faithful members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints promote and believe in traditional family, we also have to fight the centuries of traditions that prevent a family from coming unto the Savior of the world, to worship Him, to be like Him, and to forsake all that a family has blindly traditionalized for so many years. 

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We all love family traditions, but the most important tradition should be the one of faith in the Lord, Jesus Christ, covenant keeping, and temple ordinances that bind a family for eternity. Sister Cheryl Lant, former Primary General President, said:

“What kinds of traditions do we have? Some of them may have come from our fathers, and now we are passing them along to our own children. Are they what we want them to be? Are they based on actions of righteousness and faith? Are they mostly material in nature, or are they eternal? Are we consciously creating righteous traditions, or is life just happening to us? Are our traditions being created in response to the loud voices of the world, or are they influenced by the still, small voice of the Spirit? Are the traditions that we are creating in our families going to make it easier for our children to follow the living prophets, or will they make it difficult for them?” (“Righteous Traditions,” General Conference, Apr 2008).

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