Category Archives: Hastening the Work

Visiting Teachers: Representatives of the Lord

women-gather-661366-galleryA couple of years ago, the priesthood session of LDS general conference started being broadcast on BYUtv.  Now, during each priesthood session I turn on the TV so my husband can watch it, and I get to listen as well. In order for my husband to fully pay attention, I tend to our home and kids by myself. (He hasn’t asked me to do this, I choose to because I want him to enjoy the session the way I enjoy the women’s session.) During the most recent Priesthood Session, Elder Jeffrey R Holland gave his talk, “Emissaries to the Church”. As he began talking, I immediately felt a strong impression to really listen and pay attention. Elder Holland spoke about home teaching, and much of what he said can be applied to visiting teaching as well.

Visiting teaching is a topic near and dear to my heart because I love it! I truly do. I love visiting with my sisters, I love my companion, and I love being visited by my visiting teachers. I wasn’t always that way, though. When I first turned 18, I rarely went and my companion always set up the appointments and gave the message.  When I moved into a single’s ward, I never went visiting teaching. I always felt a little guilty because my home teachers came monthly without fail. When I got married and returned to a family ward setting, I tried to do better. My success, however, depended on my companions and their investment into visiting teaching. Continue reading

Our Special Responsibility

Pacific LDS WomenI was sitting in Relief Society when the teacher asked us a fairly simple question: Why are we special? A few generic answers were given, but one of those generic answers (which we’ve heard a million times) suddenly didn’t sit well with me. The answer given was: Because we have the gospel.

 

I continued to sit quietly in class, but suddenly my mind was on fire. I had complete clarity with new understanding. We are NOT special because we have the gospel. EVERYONE is special because they exist on this earth. The reason why we are special is because we have a SPECIAL RESPONSIBILITY placed upon us to live, share, and defend the gospel of Jesus Christ. Love will be our catalyst, and if we learn to watch, we can have wonderful opportunities.

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Social Media: Making It Easy

facebook“Mormon Women Stand is not an official page of the Church. However, as members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, we strive to follow the counsel provided in the new Handbook 2: Administering the Church, which addresses social media use: “Members are encouraged to use the Internet to flood the earth with testimonies of the Savior and His restored gospel. They should view blogs, social networks, and other Internet technologies as tools that allow them to amplify their voice in promoting the messages of peace, hope, and joy that accompany faith in Christ.” (Handbook 2, 21.1.22).” Mormon Women Stand Mission Statement

In D&C 81:88 it says, “Behold, I sent you out to testify and warn the people, and it becometh every man who hath been warned to warn his neighbor.”

In April 1959, President David O. McKay declared “every member a missionary”. In 1997 Richard G. Scott taught about this. He said:

There are few things in life that bring as much joy as the joy that comes from assisting another improve his or her life. That joy is increased when those efforts help someone understand the teachings of the Savior and that person decides to obey them…  I know many more would follow that charge were they to realize that there are many different ways to fulfill that responsibility. Continue reading

When the Lord Calls – Three Ways to be Ready

Elder and Sister PackardIt All Began Here….

When we were forty years old we were given a good amount of stock as part of a business deal. It was projected to increase well in value and be the means to our financial security and early retirement. We went to our financial adviser and enlisted his help. We intended to retire from our business at the age of fifty, just ten years from then. Our plan was to serve as a full-time senior missionary couple for our church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, at that point. In fact we planned to serve several, alternating spans of time at home and then back out into the field. Our adviser helped us chart out what things needed to be accomplished in the next ten years. We took our plan to the Lord, promising that if He would help us accomplish these things we were His at age fifty. Then we went to work. With laser-beam focus we attacked several personal financial goals…pay off the house, have ‘X’ amount in savings, wills and trusts established, get out and keep out of consumer debt, etc., along with many business goals. Continue reading

Why You Should Think About Second Coming Every Day

Andersen Second ComingWe live in perilous times. Our time, as no other before, is fraught with confusion and deceit at every turn intended to ultimately blind us spiritually. Technology plays a key role in enabling the circumstance. With even a partial obstruction to our vision, we are at risk of bumping into the unexpected, or worse become lost. The interesting aspect of spiritual blindness is the inability to know (or accept) we are on the wrong path and lost – confused. Another interesting characteristic of the spiritually blind is the confidence often displayed and by which they encourage others to come along – very effective.

President James E. Faust taught that,

The Holy Ghost gives worthy Saints both spiritual guidance and protection. It increases our knowledge and our understanding of “all things.” This is of immense value at a time when spiritual blindness is increasing (James E. Faust, “The Light in Their Eyes“, Oct. 2005 General Conference).

He went on to explain additional reasons why it is so important that we have a clear view of the world we must now navigate.

Secularism is expanding in much of the world today. Secularism is defined as “indifference to or rejection or exclusion of religion and religious considerations.”  Secularism does not accept many things as absolutes. Its principal objectives are pleasure and self-interest. Often those who embrace secularism have a different look about them (James E. Faust, Ibid.).

Interesting. Continue reading